Planting Sugar Maple Trees – How To Grow A Sugar Maple Tree


By: Teo Spengler

If you are thinking of planting sugar maple trees, you probably already know that sugar maple are among the best-loved trees on the continent. Four states have picked this tree as their state tree – New York, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Vermont – and it is also the national tree of Canada. While grown commercially for its sweet syrup and value as lumber, sugar maple also makes an attractive addition to your backyard. Read on for more sugar maple tree facts and to learn how to grow a sugar maple tree.

Sugar Maple Tree Facts

Sugar maple tree facts provide lots of interesting information about this remarkable tree. Well before colonists began sugar maple tree growing in this country, Native Americans tapped the trees for their sweet syrup and used the sugar made from it for bartering.

But sugar maples are lovely trees in and of themselves. The dense crown grows in an oval shape and offers ample shade in the summer. The leaves are dark green with five distinct lobes. The small, green flowers grow in groups hanging downward on slender stems. They flower in April and May, producing the “helicopter” winged seeds that mature in autumn. About that same time, the tree puts on a fantastic fall show, its leaves turning to bright shades of orange and red.

How to Grow a Sugar Maple Tree

If you are planting sugar maple trees, select a site in full sun for best results. The tree will also grow in partial sun, with at least four hours of direct, unfiltered sun every day. A sugar maple tree growing in deep, well-drained soil is happiest. The soil should be acidic to slightly alkaline.

Once you have finished planting sugar maple trees, they will grow at a slow to medium rate. Expect your trees to grow from one foot to two feet (30-61 cm.) each year.

Caring for Sugar Maple Trees

When you are caring for sugar maple trees, irrigate them during dry weather. Although they are fairly drought tolerant, they do best with soil that is constantly moist but never wet.

A sugar maple tree growing in too small a space will only create heart ache. Be sure you have sufficient room to grow one of these beauties before planting sugar maple trees – they grow to 74 feet (22.5 m.) tall and 50 feet (15 m.) wide.

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Read more about Maple Trees


Sugar Maple Tree Facts: Sugar Maple Tree Growing Information - garden

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Growing up in Sugar Maple, Vermont, knit shop owner and sorceress-in-training Chloe Hobbs learned to keep a secret before she learned to tie her shoes. When your town is home to werewolves, vampires, trolls, sprites, and everything else the real world is told doesn't exist, you learn quickly how to hide in plain sight.

And now she's keeping the happiest secret of her life: she and 100% human chief of police Luke MacKenzie are going to have a baby.

But when a quiet young knitter at an afternoon workshop blurts out a warning about Chloe's unborn baby girl, Chloe and her magickal friends quickly discover just how hard it is to keep the biggest secret of them all.

Praise for USA Today best-selling author Barbara Bretton

"Bretton seamlessly blends a playful world of eccentric and meddling supernatural creatures." Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"Bretton spins an imaginative and charming tale." Booklist (starred review)

"Bretton has created a paranormal series that is both engaging and timely for those who like their fantasy with a down-home flair." Library Journal

Growing up in Sugar Maple, Vermont, knit shop owner and sorceress-in-training Chloe Hobbs learned to keep a secret before she learned to tie her shoes. When your town is home to werewolves, vampires, trolls, sprites, and everything else the real world is told doesn't exist, you learn quickly how to hide in plain sight.

And now she's keeping the happiest secret of her life: she and 100% human chief of police Luke MacKenzie are going to have a baby.

But when a quiet young knitter at an afternoon workshop blurts out a warning about Chloe's unborn baby girl, Chloe and her magickal friends quickly discover just how hard it is to keep the biggest secret of them all.

Praise for USA Today best-selling author Barbara Bretton

"Bretton seamlessly blends a playful world of eccentric and meddling supernatural creatures." Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"Bretton spins an imaginative and charming tale." Booklist (starred review)

"Bretton has created a paranormal series that is both engaging and timely for those who like their fantasy with a down-home flair." Library Journal


Sugar Maple Tree Facts: Sugar Maple Tree Growing Information - garden

The sugar maple is the largest and most long lived of the three types of maples (sugar, silver, and red) found on the Nature Trail. Mature specimens reach heights of seventy to one hundred feet and diameters of two to three feet. Some individuals attain ages of over three hundred years. The sugar maple is called a "hard" maple because of the density and strength of its wood. The long life of the tree and its resistance to disease and infestations are without question due to the durability of its trunk and branch wood. Like other maples, the sugar maple has a shallow, spreading root system that is well adapted to wet soil conditions. The sugar maple, though, is not as restricted as the other maples to wet habitats and can form a deep root system in well-drained, deep upland soils.

The distinctive leaves of the sugar maple are from three to five inches in diameter and equally as wide. They have five deep, long-pointed lobes that often have a variable number of narrow, pointed teeth. The leaves are dark green above and a paler green below. In the fall the leaves turn an assortment of colors which include deep red, orange and yellow making a very distinctive autumnal crown appearance.

The flowers are yellowish-green, and they open just before the leaves expand in the early spring. Flowers are produced in great abundance every two to five years. During these heavy flower years sugar maples have a very distinctive early spring, yellow-green "glow" that is easily visible even some distances away. Samaras from the pollinated flowers developed through the summer and are released in the autumn in great abundance. Eight million maple seeds per acre have been collected in old growth sugar maple sites. Seedlings emerge in the spring. These seedlings grow well in the shaded conditions of the forest floor. Sugar maples are also able to stump sprout and root sprout after they are cut. An established sugar maple forest, then, via prodigious seed production, sprouting and long lived individuals is able to maintain itself even in the face of disruptive or destructive ecological events.

The bark of the sugar maple is light gray. It becomes very rough and deeply furrowed as the tree ages forming irregular ridges, plates and scales. The appearance and patterning of the bark of specific trees is quite individualized and variable. In the shaded conditions of the forest the trunk of the sugar maple is long and straight up into a dense, high crown. In more open conditions the trunk often branches near the ground to form a very wide, dense, rounded crown of branches and foliage.

The sugar maple is found in a number of forest associations with conifers (like white pine, red spruce, hemlock) in the northern parts of its range and with a number of hardwood species (like white ash, yellow poplar, hickories and oaks) through the rest of its northeastern U.S. range.

The sugar maple is probably best know as the source of sweet sap that can be converted into maple syrup or sugar. A tree tapped in the early spring as the sap begins to rise can yield between five and sixty gallons of sap. This sap is then boiled down to produce syrup or sugar. Thirty-two gallons of sap are needed to produce a single gallon of syrup and, as the precise sugar content of a tree's sap varies, between four and eight pounds of sugar.

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This page was last updated on October 12, 2013

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Plants→Acer→Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum 'Caddo')

General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit:Tree
Life cycle:Perennial
Sun Requirements:Full Sun to Partial Shade
Water Preferences: Mesic
Dry Mesic
Dry
Minimum cold hardiness:Zone 5b -26.1 °C (-15 °F) to -23.3 °C (-10 °F)
Plant Height :50 feet depending on growing conditions
Plant Spread :40 feet depending on growing conditions
Leaves:Good fall color
Unusual foliage color
Deciduous
Fruiting Time:Fall
Flowers:Inconspicuous
Flower Color:Bi-Color: yellow-green, borne on panicles of 5-10 together
Bloom Size:Under 1"
Flower Time:Spring
Suitable Locations:Street Tree
Uses:Shade Tree
Edible Parts:Sap
Eating Methods:Cooked
Resistances:Humidity tolerant
Drought tolerant
Containers:Not suitable for containers
Miscellaneous:Tolerates poor soil
Goes Dormant

Discovered in Caddo county Oklahoma. Does not like to be irrigated. This tree stands up to drying winds & heat.

The Sugar Maple [Acer saccharum] is native to the hardwood forest of eastern Canada and northern portions of the Central and Eastern United States. It is the tree that gives rise to all the stories you hear and the photos you see of "fall in New England." It is the primary source of maple syrup.

The 'Caddo' Sugar Maple [Acer saccharum 'Caddo'] is a "naturally occurring southern ecotype or subspecies" that was found growing in the Wichita Mountains in Caddo County, Oklahoma. Its leaves, seeds, growth form and other features appear to be very similar to seedlings from northeastern states. The discovery and ultimate propagation of this subspecies has made it possible to successfully grow Sugar Maples on the Southern Great Plains.

'Caddo' Sugar Maple grows to be a beautiful oval to round-crowned tree with a dense foliage cover. It is easily distinguished from other Maples in the fall because foliage coloration begins at the top of the tree and gradually colors the tree from the top down until all the leaves are brilliant red-orange.

Two of the most iconic 'Caddo' Maples in Oklahoma City flank the east entrance to City Hall.


Sugar Maple Tree Facts

Sugar maple is one of the most abundant species of maple. Read on, to know some facts about this tree.

Sugar maple is one of the most abundant species of maple. Read on, to know some facts about this tree.

The scientific name of sugar maple is Acer saccharum. This tree is native to North America, and is the most commonly found species amongst the seven types of maples. It grows in abundance throughout South Ontario, Nova Scotia, New England, Texas, Georgia, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Mid-Atlantic states. The facts regarding this tree, are pretty interesting to know.

Facts About Sugar Maple Trees

Maple trees are usually grown in gardens as landscaping plants, owing to their beauty and their extensive branching system. You might be well accustomed to maple syrup, that has an extensive use in making desserts. The sugar maples are found in almost all places in the United States. Find the facts described below.

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1. Growth: The normal height of sugar maple trees ranges between 70-100 feet. The trees have an average diameter of 5 feet. The trees, when grown under optimal conditions, can even exceed the height of 100 feet. One of the important facts that kids should know is that the tallest or the largest tree belonging to this category, has a height of 110 feet, and a width of 5.6 feet. This tree is present in Bethany, West Virginia. During the initial years of growth, the bark appears dark gray in color, but on maturing, a very rough textured, dark brown colored bark is seen.

2. Leaves and Flowers: Sugar maple has dark green singlet leaves. Their under-surface is comparatively less dark. The leaves are 3-5 inches long, and very smooth. The buds are arranged on the twigs in an opposite fashion, and are pointed sharp, appearing brown in color. The color of the flowers ranges from pale to greenish yellow, and they are arranged in clusters. The plant is monoecious, containing both male and female reproductive organs. The male flower is pistillate while the female is staminate.

3. Suitable Conditions for Growth: The tree normally flourishes during the month of January, within temperatures ranging from 0-50° F. It also adapts to summer temperatures prevalent in those geographical locations. It can tolerate summer temperatures of 90-100° F. It can sustain annual rainfall of 20-50 inches, but the heavy frost during the month of September and November is harmful for it. If you are growing sugar maple at home, then make sure that the soil is well drained, fertile, and has good texture. Maintain the moisture conditions of the soil, ensuring there’s no water clogging or dampness. The optimal pH should range from 5.5-7.3.

4. Produce: Sugar maple produces huge quantities of seeds, which form food for many animals. Seeds are capable of germination, and hence, you can use them for propagation of the plants. You will find the trees blooming with flowers during the seed-bearing season. They also produce sap, and while pruning them, you have to be careful that the sap doesn’t fall on you. Pruning is usually done during late summer or fall season. Large quantity of sap is collected during January-April, and industrially used to manufacture maple syrup. Along with this, the trees have considerable economic importance due to their trunks, which are used for lumbering.

5. Diseases: Sugar maple trees are susceptible to a number of diseases. The most common diseases are gall and canker, caused by fungal attack. Sclerotium bataticola and Rhizoctonia solani are some of the plant pathogens that attack these plants during seedling stage. The plants are more vulnerable to stem, vascular, and foliage diseases due to fungal and bacterial attack.

This was a short and informative guide to facts about the sugar maple tree. The next time you come across this tree, try to analyze it, and relate the facts that you have read in this article.


How to Identify Sugar Maple Trees

Last Updated: October 8, 2020 References Approved

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The sugar maple tree (Acer saccharum) grows abundantly in the northeastern part of North America: the northeastern United States (including as far south as Tennessee) and the southeastern portion of Canada. Sugar maples produce strong timber and yield maple syrup, and both commodities contribute considerably to the economy of the region. The economic significance of the sugar maple is evidenced by its designation as New York’s state tree, and by its central placement on the Canadian flag. Sugar maples can be identified by their distinct leaves, bark, twigs, and by their small fruit.


Facts about Autumn Blaze Maple

  • The autumn blaze maple tree had been patented by late Glenn Jeffers, who was from the Jeffers Nursery in north central Ohio.
  • It belongs to the Acer rubrum x Acer saccharinum hybrid variety.
  • It was first grown and developed by Poplar Farms, Inc. of Batavia.
  • Under the plant patenting system in the United States, the name Autumn Blaze is filed under the number PP#4864.
  • This tree is basically a combination of two types of maple trees, the red maple and the silver maple.
  • It is a very popular landscaping tree because of its rich fall foliage.
  • The foliage of this maple tree variety is a combination of deep red with a slight tinge of golden-orange in it.
  • The average height of the tree is somewhere between 50-60 feet, and it spreads to about 30-40 feet in width.
  • The bark of an autumn blaze maple is smooth. It is a shade of white when the tree is young, and then moves on to a darker shade of brown as it ages.
  • This tree can grow equally well in any type of soil. It can grow in clay, loam, well-drained, and even in sandy soil.
  • Using a little acidic soil can enhance the color of the fall foliage.
  • As far as sunlight for this tree is concerned, it can grow well in an area that receives even just a little sunshine or is partly covered in shade.
  • It is quite a hardy tree and can withstand different types of weather conditions, like the freezing cold of zone 3 and even the heat and humidity of zone 8. This extreme adaptability can be termed as a gift from its parent tree, the silver maple.
  • The leaves of this maple have 5 lobes, and are slightly jagged at the ends. They appear green in summer, turn orange as fall approaches, and finally a deep crimson in autumn.
  • Generally, people prefer to buy young trees for their gardening and landscaping uses, rather than buying seeds of these trees. This is because the seeds take long to germinate and develop. So, it is a better option to leave the birthing to professional nurseries.
  • The growth rate of the tree is quite high, and is one of its most significant plus points. It can grow to nearly 7 feet within a year.
  • The flowers of the autumn blaze maple are generally not clearly visible. The tree blooms in spring and sheds by fall, when it looks simply stunning.
  • Some of the most common problems associated with this tree are outbreaks of tree diseases and fungus infestation.
  • The fully grown tree has an oval shape, which can be maintained by regular pruning when the tree is young.

Those were all the autumn blaze maple facts that I thought you would like to know before you went out and bought one for your garden. It is an exquisitely beautiful tree that will definitely add to the glamor quotient of your garden.

Would you like to write for us? Well, we're looking for good writers who want to spread the word. Get in touch with us and we'll talk.


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