Aeonium 'Cyclops' (Giant Red Aeonium)


Scientific Name

Aeonium 'Cyclops'

Common Names

Giant Red Aeonium

Scientific Classification

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Sedeae
Subtribe: Sedinae
Genus: Aeonium

Description

Aeonium 'Cyclops' is a beautiful succulent that forms rosettes of dark reddish-bronze leaves on stems that grow up to 4 feet (1.2 m) tall. The rosettes are up to 18 inches (45 cm) in diameter. The newest emerging leaves are green, which gives the rosettes a "green eye." It grows quickly and produces small, yellow, star-shaped flowers on racemes from late winter through early spring. The flower stems emerge from the center of the rosettes.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 9b to 11b: from 25 °F (−3.9 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

Aeoniums do not like hot or dry weather. They may go dormant in summer and do not require any water, except in arid conditions. In extreme heat, their leaves will curl to prevent excessive water loss. Growing them in moist shade will keep them growing, but their true growth season is winter to spring, when temperatures are cool, 65 to 75 °F (18 to 24 °C), and damp. In the winter, water whenever the soil has dried out. Test by poking your finger down into the soil an inch or 2 (2.5 to 5 cm). Too much moisture or allowing them to sit in wet soil will cause root rot.

A sandy loam or regular potting mix is better than a mix specifically for cacti and succulents since Aeoniums need some moisture. If you are growing them in containers, repot every 2 to 3 years with fresh potting soil.

Feed during the growing season with a half-strength balanced fertilizer every month or so. Do not feed while dormant. See more at How to Grow and Care for Aeonium.

Parentage

Aeonium 'Cyclops' was created by eminent southern California horticulturist Jack Catlin by crossing Aeonium undulatum with Aeonium arboreum 'Zwartkop'. It is a sister seedling to Aeonium 'Voodoo'.

Links

  • Back to genus Aeonium
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Aeonium ‘Voodoo’ (Giant Red Aeonium) – Succulent plants

Aeonium ‘Voodoo’ is an attractive, tall succulent plant. It forms rosettes of dark reddish-bronze leaves on stems up to 1.5 m tall. This hybrid was created by southern California horticulturist Jack Catlin by crossing Aeonium undulatum with Aeonium arboreum ‘Zwartkop’.

Scientific Classification:

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Sedeae
Subtribe: Sedinae
Genus: Aeonium

Scientific Name: Aeonium ‘Voodoo’
Common Names: Giant Red Aeonium

How to grow and maintain Aeonium ‘Voodoo’ (Giant Red Aeonium):

Light:
It thrives best in full sunlight to part sunlight in a sheltered spot, but the bright light enhances the rich hues of the darker Aeoniums.

Soil:
It grows well in humus-rich, moist but well-drained, any good potting mix soil.

Temperature:
It prefers ideal temperatures of 65ºF – 75ºF / 18ºC – 24ºC and no lower than 50ºF / 10ºC.

Water:
Water moderately but consistently during the growing season, Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Allow the top one inch of soil to dry out between waterings. During the winter reduce watering to a minimum.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize your plant once every 2 weeks during the active growth period with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted by half. Do not feed while dormant.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated by seed or by stem cuttings. Sow seed at 19-24ºC in spring. Take cuttings of rosettes in the spring and kept at 18ºC and barely moist until rooted.

Pests and Diseases:
It has no serious pest or disease problems. Slugs can do some damage and the occasional bird may take a bite.


Aeoniums: Plant Care and Collection of Varieties

Identification
It can be difficult to identify most random Aeoniums in cultivation. On top of the considerable variation within a species, any given plant can be incredibly different in size and appearance depending on the season, the exposure, the care, and the container. And most plants in cultivation are not species but hybrids or cultivars. + Show More

Most Aeonium species are actually rare in cultivation. Mass-produced cultivars include the purple-leafed “Zwartkop” and several of its named hybrids, plus a few delightful variegates, including “Kiwi” and “Sunburst”.

The fine marginal hairs which decorate most Aeonium leaves are a useful feature to distinguish them from other similar-looking rosette succulents from the New World, like Echeverias. Aeoniums typically have thinner leaves, with two exceptions: sedifolium and nobile, which also lack marginal hairs but may have tiny bumps instead. Most Aeonium species (except tabuliforme) grow a stem, which may reach up to 1m tall, and when they flower the distinctive cone or mound-like inflorescences give away the genus. Plants which are kept constrained and pot-bound will be smaller, branch less and take longer to flower.

Other features which can be used to identify Aeonium species include the surface texture of the stem (which may be flaky, smooth, fissured, or hairy) and the texture of the leaves (which may be smooth, sticky, or fuzzy). Some leaves may have water-storing idioblasts on the underside, others may have tannic stripes on top.

Care
Aeoniums benefit from typical succulent care, including strong light, regular water when the soil is going dry, and good drainage. They do not demand a lot of space in pots, but the larger plants do appreciate some extra room, and one Aeonium (nobile) gets large enough to become impractical in most containers. Most Aeoniums do not make great house plants because of their need for strong light. + Show More

Consider your climate when deciding where to put your plant and what care to give it. Aeoniums for the most part come from mild locations and they are best suited to mild Mediterranean climates. They do not like freezing cold or extreme heat. Provide a warm, sunny location when overwintering them and consider sun protection during the hottest days of summer in marginal climates. The greatest danger in summer comes when it does not cool down at night. In areas with heavy summer rainfall, overhead protection may be necessary to prevent rot.

Aeoniums also suffer from the same insect pests that affect other succulents, including mealy bugs (which hide out at the base of leaves, close to the stem near the growth points) and aphids (found in a similar location or at the center of the rosette). The latter are particularly problematic during flowering. Look for ant traffic as a sign of infestation. Aeonium flowers tend to be bug magnets in the patio or container garden this behavior is greatly reduced by natural predation in the landscape.

Aeoniums are delectable to most herbivores, including mammals (squirrels, rabbits, livestock), especially when newly planted and during times of drought, since the succulent leaves store water.

Propagation
The plants which branch are usually very easy to start from cuttings taken just below a rosette. + Show More

Seasonal Variation
The Canary Islands have a Mediterranean climate with wet winters and dry summers, and this pattern helps explain the behavior of Aeoniums in cultivation. + Show More

They do most of their growing from fall through spring, slowing down or going dormant in summer depending on conditions. Aeonium rosettes have fewer leaves in summer, often much smaller than normal and closed up on themselves to conserve moisture. Some plants also develop red or purple highlights when they experience sun or drought stress. This is normal.

It is important to understand and respect this annual cycle, which may be exaggerated by summer heat and exposure, especially in marginal (hot) climates. Despite their appearance in summer, Aeoniums do not need extra water at this time. On the flip side, during the period of active growth, which coincides with the darkest days of the year, it is important to provide strong light. Indoor Aeoniums usually require hours of daily sun during this period.

Distribution
Aeoniums are mostly from the Canary Islands, but 6 species occur elsewhere. The greatest number of species are found on the island of Tenerife. + Show More

Relatives
Aeonium is related to Sempervivum and various other succulent genera in the Crassulaceae, most closely to Greenovia, Aichryson, and Monanthes, which overlap in distribution. Greenovia was recently merged with Aeonium. Its flowers have more parts but molecular studies place it inside that genus.

Suggested Reading
Joël Lodé, Succulent Plants of the Canary Islands, 2010
Rudolf Schulz, Aeonium in Habitat and Cultivation, 2007


Aeonium ‘Cyclops’ (Giant Red Aeonium) – Succulent plants

Aeonium ‘Cyclops’ is a tall succulent plant with rosettes, up to 45 cm in diameter, of dark reddish-bronze leaves on stems up to 4 feet tall. The newest emerging leaves are green which gives the rosette a “green eye”. It grows quickly and produces small, star-like, yellow flowers on racemes from late winter through early spring. The flowers stem emerge from the center of the rosettes.

Scientific Classification:

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Sedeae
Subtribe: Sedinae
Genus: Aeonium

Scientific Name: Aeonium ‘Cyclops’
Common Names: Giant Red Aeonium

How to grow and maintain Aeonium ‘Cyclops’ (Giant Red Aeonium):

Light:
It thrives best in full sunlight to part sunlight in a sheltered spot, but the bright light enhances the rich hues of the darker Aeoniums.

Soil:
It grows well in humus-rich, moist but well-drained, any good potting mix soil.

Temperature:
It prefers ideal temperatures of 65ºF – 75ºF / 18ºC – 24ºC and no lower than 50ºF / 10ºC.

Water:
Water moderately but consistently during the growing season, Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Allow the top one inch of soil to dry out between waterings. During the winter reduce watering to a minimum.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize your plant once every 2 weeks during the active growth period with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted by half. Do not feed while dormant.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated by seed or by stem cuttings. Sow seed at 19-24ºC in spring. Take cuttings of rosettes in the spring and kept at 18ºC and barely moist until rooted.

Pests and Diseases:
It has no serious pest or disease problems. Slugs can do some damage and the occasional bird may take a bite.


Watch the video: AEONIUM VELOUR Cuttings. VLOG #38 Succulents u0026 Coffee w. Liz


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