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Walking Iris Division – How And When To Transplant Neomarica

By Mary H. Dyer, Credentialed Garden Writer

If your walking iris plants have outgrown their boundaries, or if they aren?t blooming as well as they once did, it may be time to divide and conquer. Learn more about transplanting walking irises in this article.


How to Grow Iris

Last Updated: March 29, 2019 References Approved

This article was co-authored by Lauren Kurtz. Lauren Kurtz is a Naturalist and Horticultural Specialist. Lauren has worked for Aurora, Colorado managing the Water-Wise Garden at Aurora Municipal Center for the Water Conservation Department. She earned a BA in Environmental and Sustainability Studies from Western Michigan University in 2014.

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Irises are perfect for beginner gardeners and experienced green thumbs alike! The hardy flowers are not difficult to grow and do well in a wide range of climates, being relatively drought-tolerant and low maintenance. [1] X Research source When it blooms, the Iris's flowers are gorgeous, ranging in hue from the common purple shade to patterned white and yellow. Irises are among the easiest perennials to start and grow, so start planting today for long-lasting blooms.



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